Integrative Medicine

Integrative medicine provides holistic treatment solution to promote health and wellness. It combines mainstream medical therapies and Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies.  There is high-quality scientific evidence of safety and effectiveness for this approach.

Our goal is to be “Your resource for natural health care.”  Our mission is to provide “A Natural Path to Total Wellness, for People and Pets.”

Our Integrated Wellness Center offers many treatment options including: Acupuncture, Chiropractic, Massage Therapy, Cranio-Sacral Massage, Psychotherapy, NAET Allergy Relief, Herbal Medicine, Integrative Holistic Medicine, Chelation Therapy, Diet-Detox class, Juicing Classes and more.  We also offer natural herbal care for pets.

Integrative Medicine

Mind & Body

Total Wellness

  • Integrative Therapies

62.1% of adults in the USA had used some form of Integrative Medicine in the past 12 months

“about half the general population in developed countries use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).”

 

From CAM Complementary Alternative Medicine to Integrative Medicine

Edzard Ernst, Professor of Complementary Medicine at the University of Exeter, wrote “..about half the general population in developed countries use complementary and alternative medicine (“CAM”).”[47]

Survey results released in May 2004 by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, part of the United States National Institutes of Health, found that in 2002,

  • 62.1% of adults in the USA had used some form of CAM in the past 12 months, and
  • 75% across lifespan (though these figure drop to 36.0% and 50% if prayer specifically for health reasons is excluded); this study included yoga, meditation, herbal treatments as (“CAM”).[44][48]

Many poeple are prevented by lack of information from trying these potentially beneficial, side effect free, low-cost options.

Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

Dr. Andrew Weil says “Any therapy that is typically excluded by conventional medicine, and that patients use instead of conventional medicine, is known as “alternative medicine.” It’s a catch-all term that includes hundreds of old and new practices ranging from acupuncture to Homeopathy to iridology. Generally alternative therapies are closer to nature, cheaper and less invasive than conventional therapies, although there are exceptions.

Some alternative therapies are scientifically validated, some are not.

An alternative medicine practice that is used in conjunction with a conventional one is known as a “complementary” medicine. Example: using ginger syrup to prevent nausea during chemotherapy. Together, complementary and alternative medicines are often referred to by the acronym CAM.

Enter integrative medicine. As defined by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health, integrative medicine “combines mainstream medical therapies and CAM therapies for which there is some high-quality scientific evidence of safety and effectiveness.”

Integrative medicine picks the very best, scientifically validated therapies from both conventional and CAM systems.

The Duke Center for Integrative Medicine is a classic model of integrative care. It combines conventional Western medicine with alternative or complementary treatments, such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, massage, biofeedback, yoga, and stress reduction techniques — all in the effort to treat the whole person. In the past decade, integrative medicine centers have opened across the country. According to the American Hospital Association, the percentage of U.S. hospitals that offer complementary therapies has more than doubled in less than a decade, from 8.6% in 1998 to almost 20% in 2004. Another 24% of hospitals said they planned to add complementary therapies in the future. Patients usually pay out of pocket, although some services — such as nutritional counseling, chiropractic treatments, and biofeedback — are more likely to be reimbursed by insurance.

Many people are prevented by unanswered questions, from trying these potentially beneficial, side effect free, low-cost options.

  • Psychotherapy: What does a session look like? How can it help anxiety and depression? Can it be an alternative to drugs
  • Acupuncture: Does it hurt? Should I consider treatments for pain? neuralgia? or my sciatic?
  • Chiropractic: Do adjustments save people from surgeries? can it treat
  • Massage: Will it help my head and neck tension?
  • Herbal Medicine: Can I consider herbal anti-inflammatory instead of NSAID’s that are damaging my stomach?